A Deer Bird Watching

It is rarely I see a Whitetail Deer looking up in the trees. This young Deer was bird watching. A Crow was above it in a tree making lots of noise. Several other Deer were in the area, but they ignored the Crow. This one would stare up in the tree watching the Crow.

Deer Watching Bird
Deer Watching Bird

I was sitting in a ground blind on my property with my camera on a tripod. The Deer like to stay on my property year around, and I have an area that I know they will pass through.

Gear Used:

  • Camera: Fujifilm X-T3
  • Lens: Canon EF 100-400 mm f/4.5-5.6 L IS II USM (attached with a Fringer EF-FX Pro)

Technical:

  • Location: Oden (Arkansas)
  • Date and Time Taken: November 27, 2020 (08:17 A. M.)
  • Aperture Priority
  • Aperture: f5.6
  • Shutter speed: 1/50 (as determined by the camera)
  • ISO: 3200
  • White Balance: Auto
  • Metering Mode: Multi
  • Back-button Focus
  • Single Point Continuous Auto Focus
  • Exposure Compensation: 0
  • Focal Length: 200 mm
  • Processed With Luminar 4

Here is a Tom Turkey I photographed on Thanksgiving Day out of this same ground blind: Tom Turkey On Thanksgiving Day

2023-01-31T15:37:29-06:00November 30, 2020|Categories: Deer|Tags: , , |Comments Off on A Deer Bird Watching

Fawn With Bent Ear Tips

I spotted a Whitetail Fawn feeding in a field at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. The first thing I noticed was the Fawns ears. At first, I thought the tips of the ears were missing. When I looked at my photos of the Fawn on my computer, I discovered that they were bent back.

I did some research online, and all I found was that curled ear tips on Fawns could be signs of dehydration. A Fawn that has been unable to nurse will dehydrate, causing the tips of the fawn’s ears to curl backward slightly. Healthy, well-fed fawns have straight ears. I don’t think this is the case with this Fawn do to its age and as you can see in the photo; it looks healthy and Mom was nearby.

Whitetail Fawn With Bent Ear Tips
Whitetail Fawn With Bent Ear Tips

How I Got The Photo: Fawn With Bent Ear Tips

This was a difficult photo to get because I had tall plants between the Fawn and my pickup. The plants were over 6 foot tall so when I parked on the side of the road the plants blocked my view. I opened my door and stood on the door frame and placed my camera on the roof of my pickup.

Gear Used:

2020-09-19T10:04:08-05:00September 24, 2020|Categories: Deer|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Fawn With Bent Ear Tips

Whitetail Fawn Buck Closeup

2018 was a good year for me regarding getting close and photographing Whitetail Fawns at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. I got this closeup after I parked and the Fawn became curious and came close to my pickup.

This Fawn looks like it is going to be a Buck. In the second photo I think I see nubs. What do you think?

Whitetail Fawn Closeup
Whitetail Fawn Closeup
Whitetail Fawn Buck Closeup
Whitetail Fawn Buck Closeup

How I Got The Photo: Whitetail Fawn Buck Closeup

I parked on the side of the auto tour road with my camera and lens resting on a bean bag draped over the open window of my pickup.

Gear Used:

  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon EF 100-400 mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM

Technical:

  • Location: Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge (Oklahoma)
  • Date & Time Taken: September 12, 2018 (07:28:09 A.M.)
  • Aperture Priority
  • Aperture: f5.6
  • Shutter speed: 1/200 sec. (as determined by the camera)
  • ISO: 2000
  • White Balance: Auto
  • Metering Mode: Evaluative
  • Exposure Compensation: 0 EV
  • Back-button Focus
  • Single Point Continuous Auto Focus
  • Focal Length: 400 mm
  • Processed With Luminar 4

Related Posts:

  1. Whitetail Fawn Twins
  2. Whitetail Doe And Fawn [Read More…]
2020-09-21T06:21:54-05:00September 20, 2020|Categories: Deer|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on Whitetail Fawn Buck Closeup

Whitetail Fawn Buck

Hidden in the thick weeds was a Whitetail Fawn Buck and I almost missed it. If he had not moved, I would have. This was at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma.

He’s called a button buck because his antlers haven’t yet grown. He has two bumps or “buttons” on top of his head. The buttons on this Buck are larger than normal and he comes close to being a spike.

Whitetail Fawn Buck
Whitetail Fawn Buck

How I Got The Photo – Whitetail Fawn Buck

I parked on the road with my camera and lens resting on a bean bag draped over the open window of my pickup.

Gear Used:

  • Camera: Canon EOS-1D Mark III
  • Lens: EF 500 mm f/4L IS USM

Technical:

  • Location: Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge (Oklahoma)
  • Date & Time Taken: September 13, 2010 (07:48:41 A.M.)
  • Aperture Priority
  • Aperture: f5.0
  • Shutter speed: 1/1000 sec. (as determined by the camera)
  • ISO: 800
  • White Balance – Auto
  • Metering Mode: Evaluative
  • Exposure Compensation: 0 EV
  • Back-button Focus
  • Single Point Continuous Auto Focus
  • Focal Length: 500 mm
  • Processed With Luminar 4

Related Posts:

  1. Fawns Growing Fast
  2. Whitetail Fawn At Fort Chaffee
  3. Whitetail Doe And Fawn Crossing County Road
  4. What Is Wrong [Read More…]
2020-09-19T10:10:43-05:00September 14, 2020|Categories: Deer|Tags: , , , , |Comments Off on Whitetail Fawn Buck

Twin Fawns With Fading Spots

As you can see in my photo of these twin Whitetail Fawns, their spots are fading. The spots on Whitetail Fawn fade at around three to four months old.

Fawns With Fading Spots
Fawns With Fading Spots
Fawn Spots Almost Gone
Fawn Spots Almost Gone

How I Got The Photo: Twin Fawns With Fading Spots

I was near the 4-corners intersection at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma when I spotted these two Fawns. I had my camera and lens resting on a bean bag draped over the open window of my pickup.

Gear Used:

  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon EF 100-400 mm f/4.5-5.6 L IS II USM

Technical:

  • Location: Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge (Oklahoma)
  • Date & Time Taken: September 12, 2018 (07:14:01 A.M.)
  • Aperture Priority
  • Aperture: f5.6
  • Shutter speed: 1/160 sec. and 1/200 (as determined by the camera)
  • ISO: 2000 and 1000
  • White Balance: Auto
  • Metering Mode: Evaluative
  • Exposure Compensation: 0 EV
  • Back-button Focus
  • Single Point Continuous Auto Focus
  • Focal Length: 400 mm
  • Processed With Luminar 4

Related Posts:

  1. Whitetail Doe And Fawn Reflection
  2. Whitetail Fawn Near My Cabin
2020-09-23T04:36:21-05:00September 12, 2020|Categories: Deer|Tags: , , , , |Comments Off on Twin Fawns With Fading Spots
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