Landscapes

Heavenly Blue Morning Glory

The Heavenly Blue Morning Glory, also known as Ipomoea tricolor, is a gorgeous flower that is typically found growing on the edge of corn and soybean fields.

North American Beaver Tree Art

When I saw this tree with damage from a Beaver, I thought it looked like unfinished art. This tree was in an area known as Miner’s Cove which is at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma.

Tree With Beaver Damage
Tree With Beaver Damage

I parked on the road and photographed this tree from my pickup. I had my camera and lens resting on a bean bag draped over an open window.

Gear Used:

  • Camera: Fujifilm X-T3
  • Lens: Canon EF 100-400 mm f/4.5-5.6 L IS II (attached with a Fringer EF-FX Pro)

Technical:

  • Location: Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge (Oklahoma)
  • Date and Time Taken: April 18, 2021 (08:02 A. M.)
  • Aperture Priority
  • Aperture: f7.1
  • Shutter speed: 1/680 (as determined by the camera)
  • ISO: 2000
  • White Balance: Auto
  • Metering Mode: Multi
  • Back-button Focus
  • Single Point Continuous Auto Focus
  • Exposure Compensation: -1.0
  • Focal Length: 400 mm
  • Processed With Luminar 4

Related Posts:

  1. Tree Fungus Covering Sign
  2. Tree Near Stream
  3. Gall On Oak Tree
  4. Hole Through Tree

A Single Dandelion

I came across this single Dandelion while walking the Sandtown Trail at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma.

Dandelion
Dandelion

I sat on the ground hand-holding my camera and lens to get this photo.

Gear Used:

  • Camera: Fujifilm X-T3
  • Lens: Canon EF 100-400 mm f/4.5-5.6 L IS II (attached with a Fringer EF-FX Pro)

Technical:

  • Location: Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge (Oklahoma)
  • Date and Time Taken: April 11, 2021 (09:08 A. M.)
  • Aperture Priority
  • Aperture: f8
  • Shutter speed: 1/2000 (as determined by the camera)
  • ISO: 800
  • White Balance: Auto
  • Metering Mode: Multi
  • Back-button Focus
  • Single Point Auto Focus
  • Exposure Compensation: 0
  • Focal Length: 360 mm
  • Processed With Luminar 4

Related Posts:

  1. Calostoma Lutescens
  2. An Acorn On An Oak Tree
  3. Two Mushrooms In The Ouachita National Forest
  4. Tree Fungi With Insect
  5. Daffodil A Sign Of Winter’s End

The 2020 Persimmon Seed Forecast

If you split a persimmon seed from a ripe fruit and look at the form inside, it will predict the winter weather, according to folklore. The Farmer’s Almanac website has a few photos of the different shapes.

I split two seeds open, and I discovered a spoon in both. This means that we will have a lot of snow here in western Arkansas.

Fork shape = winter will be mild;
Spoon shape = there will be a lot of snow;
Knife shape = winter will be bitingly cold that “cuts like a knife.”

Persimmon Seed Spoon Shape
Persimmon Seed Spoon Shape
Persimmons And Spider Web
Persimmons And Spider Web

The Persimmons in the second image were at the Sally Jones Causeway (Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma). I took the photo from inside my pickup. I had my camera and lens resting on a bean bag draped over the open window of my pickup.

Gear Used:

  • Camera: Fujifilm X-T3
  • Lens: Canon EF 100-400 mm f/4.5-5.6 L IS II USM (attached with a Fringer EF-FX Pro)

Technical:

  • Location: Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge (Oklahoma)
  • Date and Time Taken: [Read More…]

An Acorn On An Oak Tree

There is an Oak Tree that is full of acorns near the Phillip Parks Memorial Fishing Pier at Reeves Slough (Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge – Oklahoma). Lots of animals depend on acorns for food.

An Acorn
An Acorn

Acorns are one of the most important food sources for a variety of wildlife species, including deer, squirrels, and birds. These small nuts are packed with energy, protein, and essential vitamins and minerals, providing essential sustenance for animals during the winter months when other food sources are scarce.

Deer are perhaps the most well-known consumers of acorns. They use their sharp hooves and strong jaws to crack open the tough shells and extract the rich, nutritious kernels inside. In some areas, acorns can make up a significant portion of a deer’s diet, and the availability of acorns has been shown to impact their populations and health.

Squirrels are another major consumer of acorns, and they play a critical role in dispersing the nuts and promoting the growth of new oak trees. Squirrels are excellent at storing acorns, burying them in the ground and marking the location so they can return later to retrieve them. This behavior not only ensures the squirrels have a reliable source of food throughout the winter, but it also helps to germinate new oak trees and promote forest regeneration.

Birds also rely on acorns as a [Read More…]

Jed Johnson Tower

On a recent trip to the Wichita Mountains National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma, I discovered the Jed Johnson Tower, a fascinating piece of history sitting…

Tree Fungus Covering Sign

As I was hiking and exploring the beautiful Ouachita National Forest in Arkansas, I came across a sign that was completely overtaken by tree fungus.

Arkansas Quartz Crystals

On a recent hike through the Ouachita National Forest Ouachita National Forest here in Arkansas, I stumbled upon a hidden gem – a chunk of quartz crystals.

Dam at Devil’s Den State Park In Arkansas

I made a trip to Devil’s Den State Park here in Arkansas yesterday (11-27-19). We have had lots of rain so the waterfalls were great for photographing. The Dam was overflowing and I arrived before sunrise so I made this location my first stop.

Dam at Devil's Den State Park
Dam at Devil’s Den State Park

How I Got The Shot – Dam

I was using a Fujifilm X-T3 camera with a XF 18-55 mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS lens on a tripod.

Camera Settings

  • AV Mode
  • Aperture f8
  • ISO 160
  • Shutter speed – 0.4 second
  • Auto White Balance
  • Multi Metering
  • Focal Length – 40.7 mm

Tree Near Stream

This tree caught my eye while I was hiking in the Ouachita National Forest here in Arkansas. The stream is slowly washing the soil from under this tree and it makes me wonder how long it will stand. I did notice minnows in the water under the tree. I’m sure these minnows like the cover this tree gives them.

Tree Ouachita National Forest
Tree – Ouachita National Forest

How I Got The Shot – Tree

I had a Fujifilm X-T3 camera with a XF 18-55 mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS lens on a tripod.

Camera Settings

  • AV Mode
  • Aperture f11
  • ISO 160
  • Shutter speed – 0.9 second
  • Auto White Balance
  • Multi Metering
  • Focal Length – 18.8 mm

Tree Fungi With Insect

During my recent hike in the Ouachita National Forest of Arkansas, I came upon some fascinating tree fungi. These unique organisms have a special relationship..