Whitetail Buck With Hair Loss

By | August 5, 2019

This young Whitetail Buck is loosing hair around its neck area. The first thing I thought was that this Buck had mange. The Buck seems healthy and I don’t see thickening of the skin or redness in that area which is common with mange.

When I got home I did research on what could be going on with this Whitetail Buck.

Buck With Hair Loss
Buck With Hair Loss

I read that Scientists state that hair loss can occur on a deer due to rubbing and chewing on fur infested with lice. An infestation of muscle worms or a faulty immune system may also contribute to hair loss.

I also read that Whitetail Deer are losing hair due to ticks. Tick populations are very high in this area.

I believe I am seeing the result of deer attempting to remove ticks. This is only a guess! Most of the Deer at this refuge are covered in ticks but I only see one on this Deer. If you look close you can see a tick on its velvet antler. The velvet covered antler has lots of blood vessels and nerves. Because of this a buck wouldn’t rub its antlers this time of year to remove ticks. I’m sure it has ticks in other places I can’t see but with this deer having fewer ticks this still makes the most sense to me.

I also know Deer lick and groom one another, especially around the neck and shoulders. During this grooming process the deer are removing ticks.

What are your thoughts about this Whitetail Buck with hair loss? Leave a comment below or on Facebook.

How I Got The Shot – Whitetail Buck With Hair Loss

This Buck passed in front of my pickup truck while driving the tour road at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. With my camera, I was able to get out of my pickup without scaring this Buck. I braced my camera on my pickup truck and took a few pictures as the Buck crossed the road.

I had my Fujifilm X-T3 camera with a Canon EF 100-400 mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II lens attached with a Fringer EF-FX Pro.

Camera Settings

  • AV Mode
  • Back-button focus
  • Aperture f5.6
  • ISO 2000
  • Shutter speed 1/350 of a second
  • 0.3 exposure value
  • Auto White Balance
  • Single Point, Continuous Auto Focus
  • Multi Metering
  • Focal Length – 400 mm

Here are a couple of photos I took of Whitetail Deer with a strange growth: Whitetail Doe With Odd Growth

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