deer

Whitetail Doe In Late March

This Whitetail Doe was standing near the auto tour road at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge. She was on the backside of the Refuge in a field known as Dockery Field. I got several photos before she walked away.

I had my camera and lens resting on a bean bag draped over the open window of my pickup.

Whitetail Doe 32621-1644
Whitetail Doe

Gear Used:

  • Camera: Fujifilm X-T3
  • Lens: Canon EF 100-400 mm f/4.5-5.6 L IS II (attached with a Fringer EF-FX Pro)

Technical:

  • Location: Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge (Oklahoma)
  • Date and Time Taken: March 26, 2021 (07:28 A. M.)
  • Aperture Priority
  • Aperture: f5.6
  • Shutter speed: 1/320 (as determined by the camera)
  • ISO: 2500
  • White Balance: Auto
  • Metering Mode: Multi
  • Back-button Focus
  • Single Point Continuous Auto Focus
  • Exposure Compensation: 0
  • Focal Length: 400 mm
  • Processed With Luminar 4

Related Posts:

  1. Whitetail Doe Running Past Me
  2. Whitetail Doe Sniffing The Air
  3. Whitetail Doe Up Close And Personal

Whitetail Doe Running Past Me

I’m not sure what had this Whitetail Doe running in my direction, but she didn’t seem to care I was around. She wasn’t running hard and slowed to a walk after getting past me.

Whitetail Doe Running
Whitetail Doe Running

I photographed this Whitetail Doe while parked on the auto tour road at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. I had my camera and lens resting on a bean bag draped over the open window of my pickup.

Gear Used:

  • Camera: Canon 7D Mark 2
  • Lens: Canon EF 100-400 mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II

Technical:

  • Location: Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge (Oklahoma)
  • Date & Time Taken: February 24, 2019 (09:07 A.M.)
  • Aperture Priority
  • Aperture: f5.6
  • Shutter speed: 1/1600 sec. (as determined by the camera)
  • ISO: 800
  • White Balance: Auto
  • Metering Mode: Evaluative
  • Exposure Compensation: +1/2
  • Back-button Focus
  • Single Point Continuous Auto Focus
  • Focal Length: 400 mm
  • Processed With Luminar 4

Related Posts:

  1. Whitetail Buck Running Through Water
  2. Whitetail Buck Walking Past Me

Whitetail Doe Sniffing The Air

I photographed this Whitetail Doe sniffing the air while at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. She was trying to determine if I was a threat.

Whitetail Doe 9949 031719
Whitetail Doe Sniffing The Air

I parked on the auto tour road. I had my camera and lens resting on a bean bag draped over the open window of my pickup.

Gear:

  • Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II
  • Lens: Canon EF100-400 mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM

Technical:

  • Location: Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge (Oklahoma)
  • Date & Time Taken: March 17, 2019 (07:51 A.M.)
  • Aperture Priority
  • Aperture: f5.6
  • Shutter speed: 1/400 sec. (as determined by the camera)
  • ISO: 1000
  • White Balance: Auto
  • Metering Mode: Evaluative
  • Exposure Compensation: 0.3
  • Back-button Focus
  • Single Point Continuous Auto Focus
  • Focal Length: 400 mm
  • Processed With Luminar 4

Related Posts:

  1. Whitetail Buck Lip Curling
  2. Whitetail Doe Up Close And Personal
  3. Why Whitetail Deer Have Chin Whiskers

Whitetail Fawn Buck Closeup

Wildlife photographer Steve Creek recalls his magical experience capturing a curious young whitetail fawn buck up close at Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge.

A Friendly Whitetail Doe

This Doe began feeding on the side of the road, completely unfazed by my presence. The doe was so close that I had to back up in order to capture a photo.

Doe Feeding In Cornfield

I was thrilled to come across this Doe feeding in a cornfield at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge in Oklahoma. The corn was over head high and the Doe…

Fawns Growing Fast

If you're an avid wildlife photographer or just someone who appreciates nature, you know how fascinating it is to observe the growth of young animals.

What Is Wrong With This Fawn

I watched this Whitetail Doe and Fawn for almost two weeks. I noticed the Fawn has something wrong with its mouth and nose. I researched what this could be and the information I found wasn’t very positive for the survival of the Fawn.

Another dangerous thing for this Fawn is a Coyote I see in the same area. I have seen it on two occasions.

Fawn With Injured Mouth
Fawn With Injured Mouth

How I Got The Shot – What Is Wrong With This Fawn

I parked on the side of the auto tour road with my camera and lens resting on a bean bag draped over the open window of my pickup. This is on the far south part of the auto tour road on the north side of the road.

Technical :

• Location: Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge (Oklahoma)
• Date Taken: May 31, 2020
• Aperture: f5.0
• Shutter speed: 1/320 sec.
• ISO: 2500
• Exposure Bias: 0 EV
• Exposure Mode: Aperture Priority
• Focal Length: 500 mm
• Lens: Canon EF 500 mm f/4L IS USM
• Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II

Here are two more photos of Whitetail Fawns I have Photographed: Whitetail Doe And Fawn Closeup and Whitetail Fawn [Read More…]

Two More Bucks In Velvet

I’m catching these Whitetail Bucks out at sunrise. They don’t stay out long so I drive to where I think they will be when I first arrive at Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge. As you can see in my last few posts, I have been correct a few times.

Large Whitetail Buck In Velvet
Large Whitetail Buck In Velvet
Young Buck In Velvet
Young Buck In Velvet

How I Got The Shot – Two More Bucks In Velvet

I parked on the side of the auto tour road with my camera and lens resting on a bean bag draped over the open window of my pickup. This Buck was in the Sandtown area of the refuge past the Goss parking area. I parked on the paved section of the auto tour road.

Technical :

• Location: Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge (Oklahoma)
• Date Taken: May 31, 2020
• Aperture: f5.0 and f7.1
• Shutter speed: 1/100 sec. and 1/500 sec.
• ISO: 2500 and 800
• Exposure Bias: +1/3 EV
• Exposure Mode: Aperture Priority
• Focal Length: 500 mm
• Lens: Canon EF 500 mm f/4L IS USM
• Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II

More of my photos of [Read More…]

Older Whitetail Buck In Velvet

This looks like an older Whitetail Buck compared to the last Buck photos I posted mainly because of how his body looks and not because of his antlers. His antlers will grow all of its points (tines) by the end of this month (June). I would like to see this Buck again this fall because he will have an impressive set of antlers. Most bucks don’t live past 3½ years and my guess is this one is 3½ years or older.

If you look at the Whitetail Buck photo, I posted the other day you can see which one looks older (Whitetail Bucks Are In Velvet).

Old Buck In Velvet
Older Buck In Velvet
Older Whitetail Buck In Velvet 2
Older Whitetail Buck In Velvet

How I Got The Shot – Old Whitetail Buck In Velvet

I parked on the side of the auto tour road with my camera and lens resting on a bean bag draped over the open window of my pickup. This Buck was located west of the Sally Jones Causeway as you make the curve in the road. He was standing in what is known as the Dockery Field (east side of road).

Technical :

• Location: [Read More…]

Whitetail Bucks Are In Velvet

June is a marvelous time for photographing the Whitetail Bucks in velvet at the Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge. Toward, the end of May and throughout the month of June is when I do well photographing these Bucks. By the end of June the Bucks should have all the primary points on their racks.

Whitetail Buck In Velvet
Whitetail Buck In Velvet
Whitetail Buck
Whitetail Buck

How I Got The Shot – Whitetail Bucks Are In Velvet

I parked on the side of the auto tour road with my camera and lens resting on a bean bag draped over the open window of my pickup.

Technical :

• Location: Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge (Oklahoma)
• Date Taken: May 31, 2020
• Aperture: f5.0
• Shutter speed: 1/640 sec.
• ISO: 2500
• Exposure Bias: 0 EV
• Exposure Mode: Aperture Priority
• Focal Length: 500 mm
• Lens: Canon EF 500 mm f/4L IS USM
• Camera: Canon EOS 7D Mark II

More Of My Photos Of Whitetail Bucks In Velvet

  1. Large Velvet 8 Point Whitetail Buck
  2. Whitetail Buck Sticking Tongue Out
  3. Whitetail Buck Walking Past Me
  4. Whitetail Buck Being Curious
  5. Whitetail Buck With Hair Loss
  6. [Read More…]

Two Photos Used By The Louisiana Wildlife Insider

The Louisiana Wildlife Insider used two of my photos for an article in the Spring/Summer 2020 magazine. The article is in reference to “Anticipated Effects of the 2019 River Flooding on Louisiana’s Deer Part 1”.

Louisiana Wildlife Insider Deer
Louisiana Wildlife Insider Deer

Here is another one of my photos of a Swamp Rabbit that they used for an article (Winter 2014) (Cottontails, Swamp Rabbits and Their Management):

Louisiana Wildlife Insider Rabbit
Louisiana Wildlife Insider Rabbit

Deer Standing On Hind Legs Fighting

I have trail cameras on my property near the Ouachita National Forest here in Arkansas. One of these cameras caught two Whitetail Deer standing on their hind legs fighting. One of the Deer is a Buck and the other is a Doe. (The Doe could be a button Buck). These two Deer have appeared on my trail cameras several times over the past couple of months. They travel together.
Deer Standing On Hind Legs Fighting Deer Standing On Hind Legs Fighting

Deer rarely stand on their hind legs, except in unusual circumstances such as fighting or trying to reach higher vegetation. When fighting, male deer may use their front legs to push against each other or antler to antler, but standing on hind legs is not a common behavior.

I see this behavior with Does and they do this to establish a pecking order. My research indicates that Bucks will fight with their forefeet if they have shed their antlers. I am sure they do the same if the antlers are in velvet. The velvet has lots of blood vessels and nerves which makes the antlers very sensitive.

The hooves on Deer are sharp and could cause serious injury if struck by one. I see scars on Does and have always wondered if it was from the sharp hooves.

Trail cameras are great for letting you know what wildlife you have [Read More…]