Green June Bug In Late March Here In Arkansas

By | April 5, 2017

I was surprised to find this Green June Bug on the 26th of March here in Arkansas. I didn’t think they showed up until June. I read that this insect overwinters as a nearly mature larva in the soil. They feed and finish maturing in the spring and pupate in a cell in the soil. A few beetles may emerge in late May or early June, but most do not emerge until mid-June.

I thought this could be a Japanese Beetle because it has some copper on its wing. After comparing the two from photos on the internet, I still believe this is a June Bug. Japanese Beetles also emerge in June. What do you think?

Green June Bug On My Finger

Green June Bug – Fujifilm X100T | @23mm | 1/125 | f/8.0 | ISO 400

Here is a photo I made of a Green June Bug last September: Who Flew Green June Bugs As Kids

Green June Bug Facts

This insect overwinters as a nearly mature larva in the soil. They feed and finish maturing in the spring and pupate in a cell in the soil.

They are common in July and August and some remain active through early October. Eggs are laid in late summer. The female beetles prefer sandy soil that is high in humus or organic matter. They burrow into the soil and lay their eggs 6 to 8 inches below the surface. The eggs hatch in about 2 weeks and the larvae feed on organic matter in the soil until winter approaches. There is one generation per year.

This beetle is larger and more robust than its close relatives, the common brown May/June beetles, measuring from 3/4 to 1 inch in length and about 1/2 inch wide.

It is sometimes mistaken for the Japanese beetle, which is smaller (1/2 inch long) with brown wing covers margined with green. (Oklahoma State University)

Author: Steve Creek

An Arkansas-based wildlife photographer specializing in the wildlife found in Arkansas and Oklahoma. Steve’s images are created from his overwhelming passion for being outdoors with cameras in tow.